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Dog Days | prints

$55.00

Small: 11" x 13"
(image size: 8.8" x 11")
$55.00

CHEESECAKE BOYS series
The Cheesecake series grew out of my fascination with pin-up art from the 40’s and 50’s. It was a more innocent time (at least on the surface), and I love the elaborate scenarios that artists like Gil Elvgren and Art Frahm concocted in order to justify disrobing their subjects. A loose nail, a doorknob, or a brisk wind would all work in a pinch, resulting in hapless models accidentally exposing their unmentionables. I’m interested in exploring how gender roles were reinforced by these artistic expressions of sexuality. It intrigues me that it was considered sexy for a woman’s skirt to be ripped off before a crowd of oglers, while the male pin-up was only exposed when he wanted to be. Times certainly have changed! Men may have had a free pass on wardrobe malfunctions in the good old days, but my Cheesecake Boys are here to even the score.

ABOUT THE PAINTING
Thanks to the canine appeal of our latest Cheesecake Boy’s jeans in "Dog Days," puppy-initiated depantsings are no longer reserved for just sunscreen bottles. In a delightful, mid-afternoon backyard setting, man’s best friend unleashes a revelatory inspection of his owner’s unmentionables. And of course this brief exposure occurs in open view of lucky neighbors and passersby. A Cheesecake Boy, always suave and collected, must face these daily hindrances to staying dressed with trademark composure. So even with a dog on a mission and trousers around his knees, our boy doesn’t fret. He knows he’s got what it takes, despite the curious puppy trying to strip it away. Confidence intact even if his pants aren’t, our Cheesecake Boy reminds us all that life’s difficult moments are like dirt stains and dog slobber – they all come out in the wash.

©2008 Paul Richmond
Cheesecake Boys

CHEESECAKE BOYS series
The Cheesecake series grew out of my fascination with pin-up art from the 40’s and 50’s. It was a more innocent time (at least on the surface), and I love the elaborate scenarios that artists like Gil Elvgren and Art Frahm concocted in order to justify disrobing their subjects. A loose nail, a doorknob, or a brisk wind would all work in a pinch, resulting in hapless models accidentally exposing their unmentionables. I’m interested in exploring how gender roles were reinforced by these artistic expressions of sexuality. It intrigues me that it was considered sexy for a woman’s skirt to be ripped off before a crowd of oglers, while the male pin-up was only exposed when he wanted to be. Times certainly have changed! Men may have had a free pass on wardrobe malfunctions in the good old days, but my Cheesecake Boys are here to even the score.